At-Large Director

Ed Oller

At-Large Director

I first realized that VVA existed in 2010, which is the first year I started going to the VAMC (due to my wife’s encouragement). I kept insisting that I wasn’t eligible for care—I wasn’t injured during my tour of duty. I didn’t deserve to go to the VAMC, let alone apply for benefits.

 

After several months, I listened to my wife and started the process to be seen at a VAMC and learned that my many illnesses where related to exposure to “Agent Orange.” Now I needed support to file a claim–soon to be multiple claims. This led me to discover VVA and what it could do for me.

 

Skeptical at first, I became a member in July of 2010. I joined Chapter 242. After attending a few Chapter 242 meetings, I started to realize that I was not alone. Many of the members experienced many of the same effects of serving in Vietnam. Now VVA National, Chapter 242, and the Illinois State Council have become a big part of my extended family. The people I care about and I know, care about me.

 

Therefore, I no longer want to sit on the sideline. I want to be a voice, not just mine but for all of my extended family, to be heard, to preserve VVA’s “Legacy”–“Never again will one generation of veterans abandon another.” I will do whatever it takes to get the job done.

I first realized that VVA existed in 2010, which is the first year I started going to the VAMC (due to my wife’s encouragement). I kept insisting that I wasn’t eligible for care—I wasn’t injured during my tour of duty. I didn’t deserve to go to the VAMC, let alone apply for benefits.

 

After several months, I listened to my wife and started the process to be seen at a VAMC and learned that my many illnesses where related to exposure to “Agent Orange.” Now I needed support to file a claim–soon to be multiple claims. This led me to discover VVA and what it could do for me.

 

Skeptical at first, I became a member in July of 2010. I joined Chapter 242. After attending a few Chapter 242 meetings, I started to realize that I was not alone. Many of the members experienced many of the same effects of serving in Vietnam. Now VVA National, Chapter 242, and the Illinois State Council have become a big part of my extended family. The people I care about and I know, care about me.

 

Therefore, I no longer want to sit on the sideline. I want to be a voice, not just mine but for all of my extended family, to be heard, to preserve VVA’s “Legacy”–“Never again will one generation of veterans abandon another.” I will do whatever it takes to get the job done.