Keynote Speaker

Allen J. Lynch

Keynote Speaker

Allen J. Lynch, who received the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions under fire in the Vietnam War, will deliver the Keynote Speech at the Opening Ceremonies on Wednesday, July 17.

He joined the U.S. Army after graduating from high school, and volunteered to serve in Vietnam. While serving as a radio/telephone operator in a forward element of the 1st Cavalry Division during the bloody Battle of Tam Quan in the Central Highlands in December 1967, Lynch–in the words of his Medal of Honor citation–“dashed across 50 meters of open ground through a withering hail of enemy fire to administer aid” to three wounded 1st Cav men.

“He unhesitatingly returned to the fire-swept area three times to carry the wounded men to safety. When his company was forced to withdraw by the superior firepower of the enemy, Sgt. Lynch remained to aid his comrades at the risk of his life rather than abandon them. Alone, he defended his isolated position for two hours against the advancing enemy. Again, disregarding his safety in the face of withering hostile fire, he crossed 70 meters of exposed terrain five times to carry his wounded comrades to a more secure area.”

Al Lynch will speak about his Vietnam War experiences, about post-traumatic stress disorder, and about bullying in his Keynote–themes that he addresses in his new book, Zero to Hero: From Bullied Kid to Warrior.

Allen J. Lynch, who received the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions under fire in the Vietnam War, will deliver the Keynote Speech at the Opening Ceremonies on Wednesday, July 17.

He joined the U.S. Army after graduating from high school, and volunteered to serve in Vietnam. While serving as a radio/telephone operator in a forward element of the 1st Cavalry Division during the bloody Battle of Tam Quan in the Central Highlands in December 1967, Lynch–in the words of his Medal of Honor citation–“dashed across 50 meters of open ground through a withering hail of enemy fire to administer aid” to three wounded 1st Cav men.

“He unhesitatingly returned to the fire-swept area three times to carry the wounded men to safety. When his company was forced to withdraw by the superior firepower of the enemy, Sgt. Lynch remained to aid his comrades at the risk of his life rather than abandon them. Alone, he defended his isolated position for two hours against the advancing enemy. Again, disregarding his safety in the face of withering hostile fire, he crossed 70 meters of exposed terrain five times to carry his wounded comrades to a more secure area.”

Al Lynch will speak about his Vietnam War experiences, about post-traumatic stress disorder, and about bullying in his Keynote–themes that he addresses in his new book, Zero to Hero: From Bullied Kid to Warrior.